SPHSU PhD Student

Researcher. Investigating, Analysing, Communicating.

Welcome to my website and Blog!

I’m currently a PhD student studying at the College of Medicinal, Veterinary and Life Sciences at the University of Glasgow. My research is carried out at the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit.

Developing research experience at postgraduate level was driven by my passion for, and previous experience of Healthcare and associated Sciences. Through this I am being further skilled to take up roles in investigating and working for the improvement of Health across society. My PhD at the SPHSU will focus on natural experimental methods to analyse hypothesised causes of the falling teenage pregnancy rates in the UK.

My initial degree in Biochemistry fed my belief in the value of scientific thinking to improve Health and Healthcare, and challenged me to continually question, prove and discover.

My various work and internship roles through churches and Christian charities has given me valuable experience of Teamwork, Leadership, Problem Solving and Communication. I thrive on working as part of a team, engaging in the development of other team members and sharing knowledge and work goals.

I am looking to develop a career in working to improve Health and Healthcare through Investigating and Analysing interventions, proposing improvement through policies and practices and Communicating and Advocating for these to Public, Practitioners and Policy-makers.

You can find out more at www.gla.ac.uk/sphsu/andrewbaxter.

Latest Posts

R in Public Health Workshop
R in Public Health Workshop

On the 28th of May we delivered a four-part workshop on using R in Public Health. You can find all course materials on the GitHub Page and the workshop sessions on YouTube. Below is the Shiny session which I co-delivered.

Colalborating Internationally as an academic... and a Westerner
Why Aren't Today's Teens Getting Pregnant?
Why Aren't Today's Teens Getting Pregnant?

Originally posted here at the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit blog. With thanks to Enni for permission to reuse!